Learn where to find the VIN number of your car

How do you know that your dealer isn’t selling you a 6 month old car, under the guise of a new one? Or worse still, a car that’s over a year old. Only if you check the VIN number of the car.

Knowing when your car was manufactured is critical; after all, when you have paid good money for a brand new car, shouldn’t you be getting just that? Automotive manufactures around the world use a Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) that can be decoded to reveal the Month & Year of production. Each car has a unique VIN number that is usually stamped somewhere within the engine bay, or around the passenger compartment.

A vehicle identification number (VIN), also called a chassis number, is a unique code, including a serial number, used by the automotive industry to identify individual motor vehicles, towed vehicles, motorcycles, scooters and mopeds, as defined in ISO 3833.

VIN numbers were first used in 1954. From 1954 to 1981, there was no accepted standard for these numbers, so different manufacturers used different formats.

In 1981, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the United States standardized the format. It required all over-the-road vehicles sold to contain a 17-character VIN number, which does not include the letters I (i), O (o), and Q (q) (to avoid confusion with numerals 1 and 0).

Learn more about VIN number.

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